Testimonials | American Sign Language Program (2022)

Body

Stories we've collected from our students

I work in Human Resources at Cedar Point and one of the projects I’m working on is associate interviews where I go out into the park and survey some of our employees, asking about their job, how they like CP, etc. each interview is 2-5 minutes. Well I went up to a housekeeper and noticed she wasn’t responding when I said “hi” and then finally when she noticed I was talking to her, she signaled to me that she was deaf! Well I went straight into greeting her with all of the tools you [Lauren] and Marla have given me!! I also let her know I was really new to ASL and she said “me too!!” It was really helpful because she signed very slow to think about how to say what she wanted. Even signing her name, she looked up to the ceiling to think about the sign for each letter. But we were able to carry on the same five minute conversation as any other associate! Because of you pushing me to be the best I can be, I didn’t have to alter the interview at all (except the language :) ). She received the same experience as every other associate. You can tell she was really happy that I came into her life, but let me tell you! This was life-changing for me! I will never forget about that experience! ~Jarett, Autumn 2020

Student Uses ASL and Gestures to Communicate with Deaf Toddler at Daycare

“It's been a while since I've talked with you, but I just wanted to update you with some things I've been doing with ASL".I currently work in childcare with the cutest little one-year olds. One of our babies is hard of hearing without any aids, though I believe she will be getting hearing aids soon.

I noticed that she wasn't responding well to verbal instructions and did better when I used non-verbal commands like gesturing. I thought that she might do better with sign language in the classroom, so I have started using it with her.I've been using basic signs such as "yes" "no" "food" "eat" "sleep" "milk". She seems to be doing well with ASL and she has picked up on it fast.

ASL has been extremely useful for me in my job, and I just want to thank you for teaching me ASL!”

Rhyan L., Class of 2024

Major:Psychology

Dear Mrs. Sanders,

I do not know if you remember me but my name is Haroon Quadri. I was your students a few years back in ASL 1 and 3. [note from Lauren: Kristin was his 102 teacher] Thank you so much for writing me a letter of recommendation for medical school, I am just now completing my first year at Northeast Ohio Medical University. I also wanted to let you know all the things that we talked about when you interviewed me for what to say in my letter of recommendation was put to action in myat my new university!I have started a medical student interest group for deaf patients, where we are not going to betalking about deafness as adiseasebut as a way of life that physicians should understand before approaching their deaf patients. Thank you so much for everything and I hope you enjoy this summer!

Haroon,Class of 2019Northeast Ohio Medical University MD Candidate

"I was in Chicago this weekend and I was about to get into an Uber/taxi when my driver texted me to let me know she was deaf. When I got in the car I was able to let her know I knew sign language and have a conversation with her. I learned that she was also from Ohio, which I thought was crazy (she taught me how to sign small world)! I just wanted to share with you because I thought it was really cool that I was able to use what we learned in sign language to communicate with my driver." ~Neeloo (Spring 2015)

(Video) We Learned American Sign Language In 3 Months

"I have met a lot of friends online, which is great. One guyrandomly stumbled upon my profile page and we really had a lot of stuff in common. Both had really similar interests and the conversation was so fluid and I could feel a friendship building. He was a bit apprehensiveto tell me after talking a lot for a week or so, but he finally came around to telling me that he is deaf! He was worried I would be off-put butwhen he heard that I tookASL as my foreign language, he was so excited to meet!We have hung out a few times and it really great to still use ASL, especially with someone who I can learn from every time we hang out. He is a really great guy, deaf or hearing, and it feels great to still practice everything I learned at OSU outside of the classroom. So thanks to you and the great professors in the ASL department, I have managed to make a great friend here, which may have been a challenge without the proper communication tools I learned at OSU!" ~Justin (Spring 2014, after completing the series, graduating, and moving to NYC)

"The RPAC hosted a tournament last weekend for a Deaf and Hard of Hearing organization. It was especially exciting getting the chance to actually talk to a few of them. One of them even made mention that my ASL skills were pretty good. I took a little pride in being able to communicate with them without having to fingerspell everything, so for that I definitely have to thank you! And I just thought you would share in my excitement in knowing that this pretty cool event took place right here on campus. They DEAFinitely showed their Deaf culture by being there for a good hour or two after the tournament was over and having mass congregations with colorful conversations that I may have eavesdropped a little on!" ~Jordan (Spring 2013)

"It (ASL 1101) was a fun class and I learned a lot. I actually met a lady at a wedding 2 weeks ago who was deaf. We had a decent conversation and I was able to do it somewhat without thinking. One thing I've noticed since taking this class...I really want to talk to people more." ~Aaron (Spring 2013)

"I am currently enrolled in a speech pathology graduate program and absolutely love it!This past week I was working with a client doing some AV therapy. She was implanted with a cochlear implant six years ago, has an interpreter at school and signs at home. If there is a communication breakdown,we typically use pen and paper.In the middle of the session, a police officer entered the therapy room and told us to leave the building immediately and that there was a potential gunman on the premises. As we left, there were four or five police officers stationed on the floor, holding (really scary looking) rifles.

We exited andeverything ended up being completely fine, but I wanted to let you know how grateful I am for the skills you taught me. I was able to keepmy client calmand informed with the sign language Iretained from class. I also avoided audism whenspeaking with her and her mother after the incident. I learned so much from you and the rest of the ASL program. You are all so motivated and passionate- definitely something that rubs off on students. Keep up the fantastic work! Thanks again for all you do!"~Sarah (Spring 2013)

"I'm glad I could take part in this class and I must admit you have probably been my favorite instructor in my college career. I'm officially deeming you my ASL Momma and I look forward to not only learning more about ASL's culture, but when I take my talents to LA, I really want to start up media or some sort of Deaf television programs or station that truly shows the culture and community for what it is...maybe like a Deaf version of BET....but I really thank you for this inspiration and I hope to see you in the future." (Theater major, Spring 2012)

"I just had to email you!!!! I'm at home (Norwalk, OH) for the weekend... and I didn't think there were any deaf people in this small town! But I was wrong!!! I was at a open house for a new business with my aunt and this couple came and sat next to us and they were signing back and fourth to each other. I was nervous at first but my aunt pushed me to say hi.So I did! And I sat and chatted with them for over an hour!!! I was so excited!!!
I found out that my dad and my uncle built their house 23 years ago, and all the connections we had through their kids and my family members. We talked about how long the drive is from norwalk to columbus and so much more!!!

I just wanted to email you and say "THANK YOU!!" thank you for teaching me everything you have! It was so fun and I could tell that the lady I was signing with didn't want me to go and she just wanted to keep signing with me! It made me feel good and I'm pretty sure I made her day!
I just had to share with you!Thanks again! You both are such fabulous and exciting teachers!"
(Spring 2012)

"I work at a shoe store at Polaris and today a deaf couple came in to buy some shoes. The woman came up to me and tried to speak but she was signing at the same time, so I told her I was learning sign and that if she went slow I'd probably catch on. She and I signed back and forth for about a half hour and every time she got to a sign I didn't understand she would spell it out really slow so I could understand. It really was an awesome experience that I was able to talk to her and visa versa. When she left she wrote a note that I was the first worker she'd ever met that took the time to try and understand everything she was saying. She then took our online customer service survey when she got home and wrote my district manager an email saying that I was an awesome associate. So long story short, ASL helped me get in good with my managers." (Spring 2012)

"I'm now done with the ASL series and have finished my language requirements at OSU, and while it will be a strange feeling not having ASL on my schedule after taking it a year straight, it was one of the best decisions I made in my academic career.

I saw those big language programs as these massive institutions with a bunch of teachers and grad students teaching, etc… and it just felt like it was recipe for disaster with me. Then several kids I knew told me about the ASL program. They gave me great testimonial to the teachers within the program—that they were very caring, and understanding individuals, who really worked hard to make sure their students succeeded. That’s what sold me on ASL—and I’m sending you all this email today to say that the three of you, each in your own way, proved for their review to be 110% accurate.

I have some great teachers at OSU, but going through the ASL program has almost been a nice closing microcosm of my instructor experience in college—people who have been caring, understanding, helpful, and thoughtful beyond belief. The collective way I was treated, as a student in the ASL program was nothing short of unbelievable. There was never once a moment where I didn’t think my well being as a student wasn’t genuinely cared about. So while I by no means am exiting the ASL program as the most academically successful student to graduate from the series, I confidently feel that I've achieved a comfort with the concept of learning a language that I never thought I would achieve. As I said, taking ASL has been one of the best academic decisions I have ever made. ~Zach (Summer 2011)

"My experience with the ASL program at Ohio State could not have been better. The teachers were so passionate and made each class a fun, worthwhile experience. The way the curriculum was taught made me look forward to each class. I would recommend taking ASL to anyone with the slightest interest in discovering a new language!" ~Kevin (Spring 2011)

Testimonials | American Sign Language Program (1)Top of page

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This spring, Alison Samsel, a professional student in Pharmacy, administered a COVID-19 vaccine to a patient who is Deaf at a Meijer pharmacy where she works as an intern. Coincidentally, she was taking her first semester of American Sign Language (ASL) at the time. She was able to use her beginner’s ASL skills to make small talk with the patient and she utilized gestures, facial expressions, and lip movements to communicate important information to him about the vaccine. Alison’s ASL instructor, Kristin Wickham-Saxon, calls it a perfect example of a student utilizing tools learned in class to communicate even with limited vocabulary.

As any non-English speaker will confirm, when someone speaks at least a little of your native language, it makes all the difference. People appreciate it. Alison had people skills in mind from very early on in her professional life. She started her studies in pharmaceutical research but later decided she wanted more direct contact with patients. While working in an independent pharmacy, she sometimes felt frustrated about having to communicate with patients who are Deaf through writing. “It takes so much longer to write everything down and I was worried they were less likely to ask questions about their medication in writing,” she says. That is when she decided to take an ASL class.

Alison says she was very nervous when talking to her patient during the vaccination. “I never spoke to a patient who is Deaf in ASL before."
One lesson surely to be learned here:

Do not be afraid to use your language skills, no matter how limited you feel they are.

A funny moment for Alison came when she signed “fifteen” as “one” and “five” even though she had already learned the sign for fifteen in class. “I blanked out,” she laughs, “but he must have understood because he did wait fifteen minutes before leaving.” And what’s even more important, Alison says, he came for his second dose!

Testimonials | American Sign Language Program (3)

(Video) Beautifully Well Lifestyle Change Program: American Sign Language

OSU Gymnast Uses ASL to Connect with Deaf Child

I’m on the gymnastics team here at Ohio State, and the other day, my team and I were
signing autographs for kids. One of the kids was hard of hearing and I noticed that she was using
ASL. When she made her way down the autograph table to where I was, I was able to sign “Hi!
Nice to meet you! My name is Hannah” to her and it made her SO happy! It was such a cool
experience.

Hannah O.

Major: Communication Technology

Minor: Psychology

Class of 2024

(Video) Tarrant County College - American Sign Language program testimonial video

Testimonials | American Sign Language Program (4)

(Video) American Sign Language

This spring, Alison Samsel, a professional student in Pharmacy, administered a COVID-19 vaccine to a patient who is Deaf at a Meijer pharmacy where she works as an intern. Coincidentally, she was taking her first semester of American Sign Language (ASL) at the time. She was able to use her beginner’s ASL skills to make small talk with the patient and she utilized gestures, facial expressions, and lip movements to communicate important information to him about the vaccine. Alison’s ASL instructor, Kristin Wickham-Saxon, calls it a perfect example of a student utilizing tools learned in class to communicate even with limited vocabulary.

As any non-English speaker will confirm, when someone speaks at least a little of your native language, it makes all the difference. People appreciate it. Alison had people skills in mind from very early on in her professional life. She started her studies in pharmaceutical research but later decided she wanted more direct contact with patients. While working in an independent pharmacy, she sometimes felt frustrated about having to communicate with patients who are Deaf through writing. “It takes so much longer to write everything down and I was worried they were less likely to ask questions about their medication in writing,” she says. That is when she decided to take an ASL class.

Alison says she was very nervous when talking to her patient during the vaccination. “I never spoke to a patient who is Deaf in ASL before."
One lesson surely to be learned here:

Do not be afraid to use your language skills, no matter how limited you feel they are.

A funny moment for Alison came when she signed “fifteen” as “one” and “five” even though she had already learned the sign for fifteen in class. “I blanked out,” she laughs, “but he must have understood because he did wait fifteen minutes before leaving.” And what’s even more important, Alison says, he came for his second dose!

Testimonials | American Sign Language Program (5)

OSU Gymnast Uses ASL to Connect with Deaf Child

I’m on the gymnastics team here at Ohio State, and the other day, my team and I were
signing autographs for kids. One of the kids was hard of hearing and I noticed that she was using
ASL. When she made her way down the autograph table to where I was, I was able to sign “Hi!
Nice to meet you! My name is Hannah” to her and it made her SO happy! It was such a cool
experience.

Hannah O.

Major: Communication Technology

Minor: Psychology

Class of 2024

FAQs

How long does it take the average person to learn ASL? ›

Are you thinking about learning sign language? If so, you might be surprised to learn that learning the basics of ASL can take just 60 to 90-hours. By comparison, learning a new spoken language like French can take anywhere from three to six months.

How hard is it to become fluent in sign language? ›

Individual signs are relatively easy to learn. Like any spoken language, ASL is a language with its own unique rules of grammar and syntax. To learn enough signs for basic communication and to sign them comfortably, can take a year or more.

How long does it take to get good at ASL? ›

How Long Does It Take to Learn American Sign Language? Learning fundamental American Sign Language (ASL) can be accomplished in as little as 60-90 hours. In contrast, this could take approximately 6 (3 – credit) ASL courses spread out over two to three years to go from beginner to intermediate proficiency.

What percentage of the US knows ASL? ›

In fact, of the 48 million people in the United States with hearing loss, less than 500,000 — or about 1% — use sign language.

What is the hardest part about learning ASL? ›

One of the challenges people face when learning American sign language (ASL) is that it requires them to stop "thinking straight English" and rely on abstraction and other skills to communicate both dynamically and accurately.

How many people are fluent in ASL? ›

Despite its wide use, no accurate count of ASL users has been taken. Reliable estimates for American ASL users range from 250,000 to 500,000 persons, including a number of children of deaf adults and other hearing individuals.

What are the disadvantages of sign language? ›

Sign language requires the use of hands to make gestures. This can be a problem for people who do not have full use of their hands. Even seemingly manageable disabilities such as Parkinson's or arthritis can be a major problem for people who must communicate using sign language.

Why is sign language so hard? ›

ASL is a complete and complex language, with all the nuances and subtleties of a spoken language. Like all languages, it is not mastered easily beyond a basic level. Mastery requires extensive exposure and practice.

Is ASL harder than spoken language? ›

It's at least as difficult. Sign languages have the same complexity and abstraction that spoken languages do. Some of the signs are iconic (i.e., they look like what they describe), but most aren't. The grammars of sign languages have syntax, morphology, phonology--- all the tricky bits of spoken languages.

How many hours does it take to become fluent in ASL? ›

Learning ASL is not easier than learning spoken French or any other spoken language. It takes at least six 3-credit ASL courses over the span of 2-3 years to attain a beginning-intermediate skill. To attain an intermediate-fluent skill, it takes another 2 years in the ASL/English interpretation training.

Is ASL difficult to master? ›

Sign language is one of the easiest languages to learn. So many of the signs are commonplace gestures. Children pick up on the signs quickly and are eager to use them. The fact that it is easy helps encourage the learning.

Is ASL in high demand? ›

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the employment of interpreters and translators to grow 24% from 2020 to 2030. This is much faster than the average for all other occupations. The BLS predicts an increased demand for ASL interpreters in particular as more organizations use video relay services.

Which country uses ASL the most? ›

ASL is used predominantly in the United States and in many parts of Canada. ASL is accepted by many high schools, colleges, and universities in fulfillment of modern and “foreign” language academic degree requirements across the United States.

Who uses ASL the most? ›

ASL, short for American Sign Language, is the sign language most commonly used by the Deaf and Hard of Hearing people in the United States. Approximately more than a half-million people throughout the US (1) use ASL to communicate as their native language.

Is it true that ASL is the 3rd most used language in the US? ›

Approximately 250,000 – 500,000 people of all ages throughout the US and Canada use this language to communicate as their native language. ASL is the third most commonly used language in the United States, after English and Spanish.

What is the best way to become proficient in ASL? ›

  1. Take a sign language class. ...
  2. Learn online by watching videos. ...
  3. Join a sign language group, deaf club or visit a deaf café ...
  4. Take an online course. ...
  5. Hire a private, qualified sign language tutor. ...
  6. Watch and mimic interpreters. ...
  7. Ask your Deaf friends and family teach you. ...
  8. Use an App.
1 Jun 2020

Can ASL be self taught? ›

There are numerous ways to learn American Sign Language (ASL) outside the old classroom method. From free online lessons to video tutorials, a world of possibilities is open for those aspiring to teach themselves this hands-on language.

Is ASL a valuable skill? ›

Learning sign language is crucial for those who are deaf or hearing impaired, as well as their friends and family members. But, what many people may not realize is that sign language can be a valuable life skill for just about anyone to develop.

What percentage of ASL is on the face? ›

Mehrabian and Ferris (1967) claim that 55 percent of communication is in the face, 38 percent is in tone, and 7 percent is in words.

Is ASL faster than speaking? ›

She compared the speed at which stories were signed and spoken. On average, the children communicated at the rate of 4.7 words and 2.3 signs per second. Signing and speaking the same story took almost exactly the same time. However, only 122 signs were used compared to 210 words, less than 60% as many.

What is considered fluent in ASL? ›

It's measured in how well you can carry a conversation in sign language.. how fluent your signs are. Are your signs awkward and choppy? As a general rule of thumb, You need a vocabulary of at least 1,000 words in a language to be able to carry on a basic conversation.

Is it worth it to learn ASL? ›

Studying ASL promotes better awareness of and sensitivity to the deaf and hard of hearing community. As someone proficient in ASL, you will develop a strong appreciation for deaf culture, and you can promote understanding and acceptance of the language among others.

Why isn't ASL taught in schools? ›

American Sign Language* is not a required school subject for the same reason that Spanish, French, Japanese, Mandarin, and Tagalog aren't required school subjects. There simply aren't enough hours in the day to teach every subject that students might find beneficial, so you have to pick and choose.

What is worse in sign language? ›

The sign WORSE actually based on the sign MULTIPLY. The two signs look almost alike. The difference being mainly indicated via your facial expression. For discussion purposes the two signs could be lumped together and called "MULTIPLY/WORSE" both of which use a "K" handshape and a single movement.

What is the most useful sign language to learn? ›

Pidgin Signed English (PSE) or Signed English

PSE is the most commonly used sign language in the United States among deaf individuals.

Which is easier ASL or BSL? ›

Those who are unfamiliar with sign language may not initially realize that someone who speaks ASL would understand very little of BSL. Even the alphabet is signed very differently. In ASL, letters are signed with one hand while BSL uses two, so even using fingerspelling to spell out words would be difficult.

Is it harder to learn Spanish or sign language? ›

If your first language is English, you might still find Spanish easier to learn than ASL, since there are some cognates in common. If you're an auditory learner, you'll probably find it easier to learn Spanish than ASL, which is spoken in the visual modality.

How does ASL affect the brain? ›

The parts of the brain active in sign language processing are very similar to those involved in spoken language processing. When we compare the brain scans of deaf people watching sign language and hearing people listening to speech, there is significant overlap, especially in the core areas.

Will ASL become a dead language? ›

American Sign Language could be a dying form of communication, thanks to dwindling education funding and technological alternatives. Many deaf people are adamant that sign language will always be essential, but state budget cuts are threatening to close schools that teach it.

What is the toughest language? ›

Mandarin

As mentioned before, Mandarin is unanimously considered the most difficult language to master in the world! Spoken by over a billion people in the world, the language can be extremely difficult for people whose native languages use the Latin writing system.

How many minutes do you speak in ASL? ›

The duration is usually 10-12 minutes. Different schools follow different formats, so the students may be provided with a list of unique topics for ASL and are free to choose the one they prefer. Once the speech is prepared, the students present it to the examiner.

How long should you practice a language per day? ›

The short answer is as much as possible.

Realistically, however, at least 20 minutes per day should be dedicated to learning a new language. The ideal amount of time to spend on daily study, if you can find the time, is an hour, but you don't need to cram it all in at once.

Can you learn ASL on duolingo? ›

Is ASL on Duolingo? Duolingo doesn't have ASL available. But there are plenty of other apps that do. Rocket Languages is another well-known language app that offers a complete ASL course.

Where do ASL interpreters get paid the most? ›

Highest paying cities for Sign Language Interpreters near United States
  • Washington, DC. $42.23 per hour. 14 salaries reported.
  • Fort Collins, CO. $31.79 per hour. 6 salaries reported.
  • Sacramento, CA. $31.42 per hour. 7 salaries reported.
  • Houston, TX. $30.56 per hour. ...
  • Austin, TX. $30.31 per hour. ...
  • Show more nearby cities.

Where are ASL interpreters needed most? ›

ASL programs report that most of their graduates are hired by schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges. In education, there is always a need for people who know sign language. Careers include being a sign language interpreter for individuals, groups, meetings, and classes in an educational facility.

What college has the best ASL program? ›

Here are the best colleges with a Asl Major
  • Princeton University.
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  • Harvard University.
  • Stanford University.
  • Yale University.
  • University of Chicago.
  • Johns Hopkins University.
  • University of Pennsylvania.

What percent of deaf people marry deaf? ›

ASL 1-2 FINAL
QuestionAnswer
Approximately what percent of Deaf people who marry are married to other Deaf people?90 percent.
American Sign Language is traditionally handed down from generation to generation through what?Residential schools for the Deaf
48 more rows

What percentage of deaf people have deaf parents? ›

The genetics of hearing loss. There is a wide variation in the causes of deafness. Because of this 9 out of 10 deaf children are born to hearing parents and 1 out of 10 children born to deaf parents are also deaf.

Is ASL a true language? ›

American Sign Language (ASL) is a complete, natural language that has the same linguistic properties as spoken languages, with grammar that differs from English.

How long does it take to learn ASL? ›

Are you thinking about learning sign language? If so, you might be surprised to learn that learning the basics of ASL can take just 60 to 90-hours. By comparison, learning a new spoken language like French can take anywhere from three to six months.

Do all deaf people speak ASL? ›

ASL is the primary language for deaf and hard of hearing people to communicate, but not all deaf and hard of hearing people use it.

Do autistic people use ASL? ›

Many children with autism have been able to learn and communicate successfully via sign language because it is visually based, unaided, and provides a mode of quick communication. Additionally, it is something that can be easily learned and used anywhere, at any time.

Does Harvard accept ASL as a foreign language? ›

Opportunities. American Sign Language can be used to fulfill the language requirement for undergraduates in Harvard College. In addition, as of 2019 students may also earn a language citation in ASL by taking Ling 73c, Ling 73d, Ling 90a, and Ling 90b.

Do most colleges accept ASL as a foreign language? ›

Colleges just like to see proficiency in a foreign language, and ASL is accepted by many colleges as a foreign language (be sure to check). If you become highly-skilled/fluent, it may actually be a "hook," as ASL is much less common than French or Spanish, but incredibly useful!

Does ASL look good on college applications? ›

Often the multi-sensory nature of ASL is a great option, and while it is not a 100% guarantee, many colleges may evaluate on a case-by-case basis and waive their standard foreign language requirements in favor of accepting ASL.

Can you become fluent in ASL as an adult? ›

It could be anywhere from a couple of months to several years. It takes time. Be patient and just keep at it. Your fluency will increase over time, provided that you regularly interact with other people who speak ASL.

How long does it take to learn ASL alphabet? ›

But when we state that learning ASL can take just 60 to 90 hours, we merely mean that this is roughly how long it takes to remember the ASL alphabet. You'll also need to master 19 various hand gestures and a variety of facial expressions if you want to start communicating in sign language.

Is ASL worth learning? ›

Knowing ASL gives you a way to build relationships with countless deaf people and a way to enjoy the richness of the Deaf community nationwide. Beyond communicating with deaf friends, ASL is also a surprisingly versatile language.

How many levels of ASL are there? ›

Students may complete all ASL course work (ASL levels 1-5), Advanced Conversational ASL (ASLS 214) and Pre-Interpreting Skills (INTR 216) prior to obtaining their ASLPI score. How do I sign up?

Where is ASL used the most? ›

ASL, short for American Sign Language, is the sign language most commonly used by the Deaf and Hard of Hearing people in the United States. Approximately more than a half-million people throughout the US (1) use ASL to communicate as their native language.

Is ASL a fully developed language? ›

American Sign Language (ASL) is a complete, natural language that has the same linguistic properties as spoken languages, with grammar that differs from English.

Videos

1. Explore Careers Using American Sign Language!
(Montgomery College)
2. 25 ASL Signs You Need to Know | ASL Basics | American Sign Language for Beginners
(Learn How to Sign)
3. Interview with American Sign Language and Interpreting Studies Program Faculty
(South Texas College Library)
4. Concerns arise about the future of USF's American Sign Language program
(10 Tampa Bay)
5. Why Students Should Learn American Sign Language | Breese Tierney | TEDxYouth@MBJH
(TEDx Talks)
6. American Sign Language in the Classroom
(Pasco County Schools)

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