Reading Literary Texts: Interpreting Figurative Language (2022)

ELA G5:M2:U2:L2

ELA G5:M2:U2:L1 Reading Literary Texts: Describing the Influence of Point of View Reading Literary Texts: Comparing Figurative Language ELA G5:M2:U2:L3

In this Lesson

  • Daily Learning Targets
  • Ongoing Assessment
  • Agenda
  • In Advance
  • Technology and Multimedia
  • Supporting English Language Learners
  • Vocabulary
  • Assessment
  • Universal Design for Learning
  • Opening
  • Work Time
  • Homework

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  • ELA Grade 5
  • ELA G5:M2
  • ELA G5:M2:U2
  • ELA G5:M2:U2:L2

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

(Video) ENGLISH 8- FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE USED IN LITERARY TEXT READ

  • RL.5.1: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • RL.5.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.
  • SL.5.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • SL.5.1b: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
  • L.5.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  • L.5.5a: Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.
  • L.5.5b: Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

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Daily Learning Targets

  • I can recognize similes, metaphors, and idioms in a text. (RL.5.1, RL.5.4, L.5.5a, L.5.5b)
  • I can accurately quote from a text, give context for the quote, and explain what the quote means when drawing inferences from a text. (RL.5.1, RL.5.4, L.5.5a, L.5.5b)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Finding the Gist and Unfamiliar Vocabulary: The Great Kapok Tree (RL.5.4, L.5.4)
  • Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher (RL.5.1, RL.5.4, L.5.5a, L.5.5b)
  • Exit Ticket: Explaining Quotes (RL.5.1, RL.5.4, L.5.5b)

Agenda

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Mystery Quotes (10 minutes)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading for Gist: The Great Kapok Tree (10 minutes)

B. Mini Lesson: Figurative Language (10 minutes)

C. Guided Practice: Explaining Quotes from a Literary Text (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Vocabulary. Follow the directions in your Unit 2 homework packet.

B. Talk to a friend or family member about a common metaphor, simile, or idiom in your home language that you can share with your classmates in the next lesson.

C. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

(Video) Explaining Figurative Language used in a literary text read

D. For ELLs: Complete the Language Dive 1 Practice in your Unit 2 homework.

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Opening A, students participate in the Mystery Quotes protocol to preview the quotes analyzed later in the lesson (RL.5.1, SL.5.1b).
  • In Work Time A, students find the gist of a narrative text, The Great Kapok Tree. This text will be used throughout the unit as students build their understanding of point of view and the kind of language used in narrative texts (RL.5.4, L.5.5a,b).
  • The pages of The Great Kapok Tree are not numbered; for instructional purposes, the page that begins with "Two men walked into the rain forest" should be considered page 2 and all pages thereafter numbered accordingly.
  • Students practice their fluency in this lesson by following along and reading silently as the teacher reads The Great Kapok Tree in Work Time A.
  • This lesson is the second in a series of three that include built-out instruction for the use of Goal 3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation (adapted from Michaels, Sarah and O'Connor, Cathy. Talk Science Primer. Cambridge, MA: TERC, 2012. Based on Chapin, S., O'Connor, C., and Anderson, N. [2009]. Classroom Discussions: Using Math Talk to Help Students Learn, Grades K-6. Second Edition. Sausalito, CA: Math Solutions Publications). Goal 3 Conversation Cues encourage students to deepen their thinking. Continue drawing on Goals 1 and 2 Conversation Cues, introduced in Module 1, and add Goal 3 Conversation Cues to more strategically promote productive and equitable conversation. In Module 3, Goal 4 Conversation Cues are also introduced. Refer to the Tools pagefor additional information on Conversation Cues. Consider providing students with a thinking journal or scrap paper.
  • Note that the student version of the "Provide reasoning and evidence" Goal 3 Conversation Cues (and expected student responses) are built into the Discussion Norms anchor chart in Work Time A. The "Challenge Thinking" Goal 3 Conversation Cues were built into the Discussion Norms anchor chart in Lesson 1. The "Think about thinking" Goal 3 Conversation Cues are not built into the Discussion Norms anchor chart, as these cues are best suited for teachers to prompt students.
  • The research reading students complete for homework helps to build both their vocabulary and knowledge pertaining to the rainforest. By participating in this volume of reading over a span of time, students will develop a wide base of knowledge about the world and the words that help describe and make sense of it.
  • In this lesson, the habit of character focus is working to contribute to a better world. The characteristics students are reminded of specifically are using strengths to help others and the environment and applying learning and putting it to good use in the school and community, as they revisit what they can do to help the rainforest within their school and community.

How it builds on previous work:

  • Some of the quotes students work with in this lesson are taken from "The Dreaming Tree," introduced in Lesson 1, and The Most Beautiful Roof in the World, read throughout Unit 1.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Some students may need additional support with interpreting the figurative language in the mystery quotes, explaining the literal meaning of the quotes rather than the figurative meaning.
  • Some students may need additional support recording their information in the correct part of the Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher.

Assessment guidance:

  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Informal Assessment: Collaborative Discussion Checklist during students' partner discussions in Opening A (see the Tools page).

Down the road:

  • Students will continue working with "The Dreaming Tree" and The Great Kapok Tree in Lesson 3 as they analyze the language the authors use to describe the rainforest.
  • In the next lesson, students will use the Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher to compare the use of figurative language in two of the texts analyzed in this lesson.
  • Students will use a new Explaining Quotes note-catcher when they plan and draft an essay in response to the texts they have read in the second half of the unit.

In Advance

  • Review the Mystery Quotes protocol. See Classroom Protocols.
  • Post: Learning targets and Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

  • Work Time A: For students who benefit from hearing the text read aloud multiple times, consider using a text-to-speech tool like Natural Reader, SpeakIt! for Google Chrome, or the Safari reader. Note that to use a web-based text-to-speech tool like SpeakIt! or Safari reader, you will need to create an online doc, such as a Google Doc, containing the text.
  • Work Time C: Digital Explaining Quotes note-catcher: Allow students to create the Explaining Quotes note-catcher using Google Docs or other word processing software to refer to when working outside of class.
  • Work Times A and C: Students complete their note-catchers in a word processing document, for example a Google Doc using Speech to Text facilities activated on devices, or using an app or software like Dictation.io.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided by in part by CA ELD Standards 5.I.A.1, 5.I.A.4, 5.I.B.5, 5.I.B.6, 5.I.B.7, 5.I.B.8, 5.I.C.12a

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by acknowledging and celebrating people and a story from a different culture, multiple scaffolds for determining the gist and approaching unfamiliar vocabulary, and explicit analysis of quotations used as evidence for claims.
  • ELLs may find figurative language challenging. Idioms, in particular, may be difficult to relate to because they are culturally bound and may be meaningless if taken at face value. Tell students they will need to learn the meaning of any unfamiliar, key idioms as they come across them. Suggest that they keep an idiom log or add new idioms to their vocabulary log. Remind them that idioms can be entertaining.
  • In Work Time C, ELLs are invited to participate in the first of a series of two optional connected Language Dive conversations. This first conversation guides them through the meaning of a mystery quote. Students then apply their understanding of the structure of this sentence when discussing metaphors in Lesson 3. They may draw on this sentence when writing about the use of concrete language and sensory detail later in the unit. Preview the Language Dive Guide and consider how to invite conversation among students to address the questions and goals suggested under each sentence strip chunk (see supporting materials). Select from the questions and goals provided to best meet your students' needs. Prepare the sentence strip chunks for use during the Language Dive (see supporting materials). Create a "Language Chunk Wall"--an area in the classroom where students can display and categorize the academic phrases discussed in the Language Dive.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Invite students to play with the Language Dive sentence. Examples:
    • Paraphrase the sentence
    • Condense the sentence (e.g through fronting: creatures that swing or glide or climb = swinging, gliding, climbing creatures)
    • Removing redundancy
  • For Work Time C, create an "Information Gap" activity by completing half of the information ("Part A") in the Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher for Group A and completing the other half ("Part B") for Group B. Make copies and distribute Part A to Group A and Part B to Group B. Allow Group A students to mingle, asking questions of Group B students to get the information needed to fill their Part A gaps, and vice versa. (Example: "What information do you have about what the 'strong heart' quote helps us understand?") Encourage students to share the information orally and then jot notes independently.

For heavier support:

  • Invite students to talk to a friend or family member about a common metaphor, simile, or idiom in their home language that they can share with their classmates in the next lesson.
  • For Opening A, consider altering the activity so that one student wears a mystery quote and another student wears the matching description of that quote written on a separate strip. Students mix and mingle, reading quote and description strips until they find their match.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation: This lesson focuses on reading skills such as inferencing and figurative language that require abstract thinking. All students, but particularly students who may need additional support with comprehension, will benefit from multiple representations in various formats. Consider using pictures in addition to text to teach inferencing (e.g., a picture of a kid with chocolate on his face and an empty plate--the inference is he ate the cake, etc.). Additionally, have visual examples of the similes, metaphors, and idioms that you discuss in class. Juxtapose a picture with the literal meaning to a picture of the figurative meaning (e.g., picture of dogs and cats falling from the sky and a picture of a lot of rain for raining cats and dogs, etc.).
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression: As students develop their abstract thinking, they can benefit from focusing on the essential skills in this lesson. For instance, consider different ways to minimize the complexity of the Mystery Quote matching activity. Instead of having students come up with a novel inference, create sentence strips with the correct inference and ask students to match them with the correct partner. Also, consider ways of varying the complexity of the Figurative Language note-catcher. Determine the individual skills that students need to practice most of all and have them focus on those as they complete the activity. See several suggestions in the lesson.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement: Figurative language can be a creative and humorous outlet for students. Consider using humor to emphasize the difference between the literal and figurative meanings of the simile, metaphor, and idiom examples that you chose. Students will be more engaged and more likely to generalize this lesson's concepts to future lessons.

Vocabulary

Key:Lesson-Specific Vocabulary(L);Text-Specific Vocabulary(T);Vocabulary Used in Writing(W)

  • infer, inference, simile, metaphor, idioms, figurative language, quote, context, quotation marks, source (L)
  • tribe, murmured, suspended, fragrant (T)
(Video) Reading Class: Figurative Language

Materials

  • Mystery Quotes strips (one strip per student; one list of quotes for display)
  • The Great Kapok Tree (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Finding the Gist and Unfamiliar Vocabulary: The Great Kapok Tree (one per student and one to display)
  • Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart (begun in Unit 1)
  • Discussion Norms anchor chart (begun in Module 1; added to with students during Work Time A)
  • Discussion Norms anchor chart (example, for teacher reference)
  • Figurative Language handout (one per student and one to display)
  • Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher (one per student and one to display)
  • Explaining Quotes handout (one per student and one to display)
  • Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Red, yellow and green markers (one of each per student)
  • Language Dive Guide II: Part 1 (optional; for ELLs; for teacher reference)
    • Language Dive note-catcher II (optional; for ELLs; one per student and one to display)
    • Language Dive Sentence strip chunks II (optional; for ELLs; one to display)
  • Exit Ticket: Explaining Quotes (one per student)

Assessment

Each unit in the 3-5 Language Arts Curriculum has two standards-based assessments built in, one mid-unit assessment and one end of unit assessment. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Mystery Quotes (10 minutes)

  • Explain that today students will continue learning about narrative texts and descriptive language.
  • Tell students they will use the Mystery Quotes protocol to make inferences about quotations from the new texts they will read and analyze in this unit. Ask students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

"What does it mean to infer?" (You use what you know and what the text says to figure out something the author doesn't explicitly say.)

  • Clarify and provide an example as needed. "To make an inference, a reader uses what he or she already knows about a topic and combines it with the text he or she read to figure out something that the author does not explicitly tell the reader. It is a guess based on evidence." Example: If someone is crying, you might infer that he or she is sad.
  • Distribute Mystery Quotes strips and pair up students.
  • Invite students to tape their Mystery Quote strip to their partner's back without revealing their quote.
  • Ask students to find a new partner.
  • Give students 2 minutes to read the quote on their partner's back and think about a hint to give the partner.
  • Give a signal and ask students to repeat, reading the quote and thinking of a hint to give to their partner about the quote.
  • After 7 minutes, refocus the group and ask students to each share a final inference about the meaning of their quote.
  • Display a list of the mystery quotes.
  • Invite students to guess which quote has been taped to their back. Invite volunteers to share how their inferences compare with the actual text.
  • If productive, use a Goal 3 Conversation Cue to encourage students to think about their thinking:

"What strategies helped you infer? I'll give you time to think and discuss with a partner." (Responses will vary.)

  • Ask:

"What patterns or themes did you notice in all of the mystery quotes?" (Responses will vary but may include ideas such as: they were all about the rainforest; they were descriptive.)

  • Tell students that they will work with these quotes later in the lesson.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading: Consider inviting ELLs who need heavier support to first listen to descriptions of the quote on their back without having to describe quotes on others' backs. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with expressive language: Provide sentence frames to bolster participation. Example: "Your mystery quote is about _____. It talks about _____." (MMR)

B. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the learning targets and read them aloud:
    • "I can recognize similes, metaphors, and idioms in a text."
    • "I can accurately quote from a text, give context for the quote, and explain what the quote means when drawing inferences from a text."
  • Underline the words simile, metaphors, and idioms in the first target and explain that these are all types of figurative language authors use to help their readers understand the ideas they are writing about.
  • Circle the word quote and explain that a quote is when you write or say the exact words of someone, and that in this case they will be working with quotes from literary texts, so they will be working with the exact words of the authors of the texts.
  • Add any new academic vocabulary to the permanent Academic Word Wall (from Module 1). Invite students to write the home-language translations of academic or domain-specific words in a different color on the Word Wall next to the target vocabulary.
  • Have students give a quick thumbs-up, thumbs-down, or thumbs-sideways to indicate how well they understand today's learning targets.
  • Preview for students that there will be a mini lesson with examples of similes, metaphors, and idioms within this lesson. (MME)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading: Tell students they can try to fully understand the third learning target as they complete the task in Work Time C. (MME)

Work Time

A. Reading for Gist: The Great Kapok Tree (10 minutes)

  • Display the cover of The Great Kapok Tree so all students can see. Explain that over the next several lessons, students will use this text to begin to build expertise about narrative texts.
  • Explain that today they will read this text for the gist and to analyze the language the author uses to describe the characters, setting, and events.
  • Read the book aloud for students without stopping.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What is the text about?"(Responses may vary, but could include that it is a story about a man's dream while sleeping under a tree in the rainforest.)

  • Post and review the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart.
  • Tell students that this text is challenging and may have unfamiliar words. Reassure them that just like when they read other texts this year, they are not expected to understand it fully the first time. Remind them that one key to being a strong reader of difficult text is being willing to struggle.
  • Distribute and display Finding the Gist and Unfamiliar Vocabulary: The Great Kapok Tree. Tell students that they can draw or write in the Gist column. These are just notes to help them remember what each excerpt is mostly about.
  • Display page 2 of The Great Kapok Tree. Invite students to follow along, reading silently in their heads as you read pages 2-4 aloud.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What is the gist of this part of the text? What is it mostly about?" (It's about a man who starts to chop down a tree in the rainforest.)

  • Use both new "Provide reasoning and evidence" (Goal 3 Conversation Cues) to encourage students to provide reasoning and evidence for their ideas as they talk about "The Great Kapok Tree" and other texts and topics:

"Why do you think that?"

"What, in the text, makes you think so?

(Video) Figurative language | Reading | Khan Academy

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"Why is it useful to provide reasoning and evidence?" (Providing reasoning and evidence helps us go beyond what we think we know and explain and substantiate our thoughts.)

  • Tell students that these two new cues will be added to the Discussion Norms anchor chart today. Focus student attention on the Discussion Norms anchor chart and add the "Provide reasoning and evidence" cues. See the Discussion Norms anchor chart (example, for teacher reference). Ensure students understand how to use these cues.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"Are there any words whose meaning you are not sure about? What are they?" (Responses will vary.)

"Choose a word you are unsure about the meaning of. Which strategy would be most effective in determining the meaning of that word?" (Responses will vary.)

  • Repeat this process as you read the remainder of the text, including the note from the author explaining why she wrote the book at the end. Add any new words to the academic and domain-specific word walls.
  • Focus students on the Working to Contribute to a Better World anchor chart and remind them specifically of "I use my strengths to help others and the environment" and "applying learning and putting it to good use in the school and community."
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"How does this text make you feel? Why?" (Responses will vary but may include: happy that the man walked out of the rainforest without cutting down the tree; sad for the wildlife that is lost when rainforest trees are cut down.)

"Think about your work in Unit 1. How might you use your strengths and apply your learning to help others and the environment? What might you do in your home, school, and community?" (Responses will vary but may include recycling and not using products that came from the rainforest.)

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"How does your family talk about dreams and what they mean? Do you have any examples to share?" (Responses will vary.)

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing: Prepare sticky notes with prewritten words or drawings based on the gist of different sections of the text. As students listen to the story, they can match the gist represented on the sticky notes with each section of the read-aloud. (MMAE)
  • To activate prior knowledge, review the meaning of characters, setting, and events. Consider using a symbol to represent these three areas each time you work on a new text (e.g., stick figure for characters, house for setting, two people interacting for an event, etc.). (MMR)
  • Differentiate the complexity of this task by either having students listen to a recording of the book or a read-aloud as they identify the gist. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with writing or comprehension: Display The Great Kapok Tree and annotate paragraphs and key words as you discuss it. If possible, annotate with quick sketches, as well. (Example: On the first page, draw a stick-figure bird in the shape of an 'm,' mimic the bird squawking, and then suddenly be quiet and write quiet. Draw two stick figures, one of a larger man and one of a smaller man.) (MMR)

B. Mini Lesson: Figurative Language (10 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the Figurative Language handout and remind them that in this unit, they have been reading and analyzing the descriptive language used in literary texts. Tell students that one technique writers use to describe things in their writing is figurative language.
  • Select a volunteer to read the first two sentences at the top of the handout, explaining what figurative language is:
    • "Figurative language is when a writer uses a word or phrase with a specific meaning that may be different from the literal meaning. Writers use figurative language to help the reader understand something new about the topic. Writers often use figurative language to compare things in an interesting or descriptive way."
  • Explain that in this unit, students will focus on interpreting the meaning of three types of figurative language: similes, metaphors, and idioms.
  • Tell students that a simile is a phrase that compares two different things using the words "like" or "as." Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner, discussing the meaning of the two examples of similes on the anchor chart (like two peas in a pod: very close, best friends; as big as an elephant: very big).
  • Repeat with metaphors and idioms.
  • Invite students to share and explain a common simile, metaphor, or idiom in their home language.
  • Display the list of mystery quotes from Opening A. Invite students to independently reread the quotes, looking for a quote that is an example of a simile, a quote that is an example of a metaphor, and a quote that is an example of an idiom.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"Reread the quotes. Which quote is an example of a simile? A metaphor? An idiom?"

  • As students share out, capture their responses in the Example column in the appropriate row on the Figurative Language handout, inviting students to do the same on their copy.
  • Consider using images in addition to text to convey the literal meaning of the example similes, metaphors, and idioms (example: a picture of a pea pod and then two friends holding hands, etc.). This will help students connect figurative and literal meanings. (MMR)

C. Guided Practice: Explaining Quotes from a Literary Text (20 minutes)

  • Remind students that writers use figurative language to help the reader understand something new about the topic, but because the meaning is not literal the reader must consider the context of the language and infer the meaning the author is trying to convey.
  • Display and distribute the Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher and tell students that this note-catcher will help them interpret the meaning of quotes from the texts they have been reading. Select a volunteer to read the headings of each column aloud, clarifying as necessary. Point out that the organizer can be used with quotes that both do and do not have figurative language, and that today they will use it to interpret quotes that include similes, metaphors, and idioms.
  • Display and distribute the Explaining Quotes handout and point out that this handout uses the same structure as the note-catcher: the four columns are Context, Quote, "What does this help us understand?" and Source.
  • Tell students they will use their note-catcher in the next lesson to write a paragraph about what they have read and will use it again later in the unit to write an essay about what they have read. Tell students that when explaining quotes, they must always give context, or explain what is happening in the text when the quote occurs. Then they will give the quote, or the exact words the author uses recorded in quotation marks, and then they will explain what the quote helps them understand or how it relates to the thesis of their writing. Finally, they must always include the source, or where the quote came from.
  • Read aloud the first quote from the list of mystery quotes from Opening A:
    • "It is a powerful tree. Those who sleep there must be strong of heart. Anyone without a strong heart might use the knowledge of the forest against our people."
  • Remind students that the phrase "strong of heart" is an idiom. Model rereading page 23 from The Great Kapok Tree and using the Explaining Quotes handout to interpret this quote and complete the first row of the note-catcher. Refer to the Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Select a volunteer to read the next mystery quote aloud:
    • "Senhor, when you awake, please look upon us all with new eyes."
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

"What type of figurative language is used in this quote?" (idiom: "look upon us all with new eyes.")

  • Invite students to work with an elbow partner to use the Explaining Quotes handout to interpret this quote, recording their thinking on the next row of the Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher. Invite pairs to share out with the group.
  • To acknowledge diversity and foster inclusion, say:

"Place your finger on the word Senhor. What language is this word? Do other languages use a cognate, or similar word? What is the translation into English? Why does the boy use this word instead of saying something informal like Man or Dude?" (Portuguese; Senor in Spanish; Sir or Mr.; Senhor is respectful.)

  • Continue with the remaining mystery quotes as time allows.
  • Explain that students will have a chance to practice interpreting figurative language and explaining quotes from literary texts throughout the rest of the unit.
  • Refocus students on the two learning targets and invite them to show ether a red, yellow or green marker for how close they feel they are to meeting each target now, with red being a long way from meeting the target and green being fully meeting the standard. Scan student responses and make a note of students who may need more support with this moving forward.
  • Repeat, inviting students to self-assess against how well they used their strengths and applied their learning in this lesson.
  • For ELLs: During or after Work Time C, lead students through Language Dive II: Part 1 (see supporting materials). Refer to the Language Dive Guide II: Part 1 (for teacher reference). Distribute and display the Language Dive note-catcher II and Language Dive sentence strip chunks II.
  • Consider differentiating the complexity of the Explaining Quotes: Figurative Language note-catcher based on the individual needs of the students. If students need support with identifying the type of figurative language, provide the three options as multiple choice and provide a definition on the page. If students need support with interpreting the meaning of figurative language, have them do fewer examples but also jot an illustration of the phrase to infer its meaning. (MMR, MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

A. Exit Ticket (5 minutes)

  • Distribute Exit Ticket: Explaining Quotes.
  • Read the questions on the exit ticket aloud for students. Then, invite them to complete the exit ticket to interpret the quote.
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading: The figurative language screamed bloody murder may confuse or alarm some students who understand the phrase in the literal sense. Tell students that Meg was not killed and did not bleed and invite them to grapple with what the figurative meaning of the phrase might be. (She screamed very loudly and with terror, sounding as if she were being killed violently.) If appropriate, invite them to act out being bitten by a battalion of army ants and whisper-scream bloody murder. To explore shades of meaning, ask:

"What is a less violent way to describe a scream?" (e.g., screamed in terror, screamed loudly)

  • Buy or ask for large paint chips from a local hardware or paint store, or print them online. Write the phrases screamed bloody murder, screamed in terror, and screamed loudly on the paint chips, each one on a different shade. Place them on the wall and discuss the shades of meaning in relation to the text. (MMR)
  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with vocabulary: To further explore shades of meaning, and in preparation for the Mid-Unit 2 Assessment, allow students to explain why fierce is the most precise word to choose to convey the ants' jaws. Have them expand their knowledge of fierce by comparing it to synonyms (e.g., dangerous, cruel, aggressive, vicious, intense).(MMR)

Homework

A. Vocabulary. Follow the directions in your Unit 2 homework packet.

B. Talk to a friend or family member about a common metaphor, simile, or idiom in your home language that you can share with your classmates in the next lesson.

C. Accountable Research Reading. Select a prompt to respond to in the front of your independent reading journal.

D. For ELLs: Complete the Language Dive 1 Practice in your Unit 2 homework.

  • For ELLs and students who may need additional support with reading and writing: Refer to the suggested homework support in Lesson 1. (For all homework assignments in this unit, read the prompts aloud. Students can discuss and respond to prompts orally, either with you, a partner, family member, or student from Grades 4 or 6, or record an audio response. If students have trouble writing sentences, they can begin by writing words. Consider providing a sentence starter or inviting students who need lighter support to provide sentence starters.) (MMAE, MMR)
  • Consider offering multiple ways for students to respond to the prompt other than written expression. Examples could include pictures, digital media, song/poem, etc. (MMAE)

FAQs

What is interpreting figurative language? ›

"Figurative language is when a writer uses a word or phrase with a specific meaning that may be different from the literal meaning. Writers use figurative language to help the reader understand something new about the topic. Writers often use figurative language to compare things in an interesting or descriptive way."

What is figurative language Why do literary texts makes use of it? ›

Figurative language compares things in order to give them more detail. We use figurative language to help the reader better understand what we are trying to describe.

Why is figurative language important in reading? ›

Figurative language is found in all types of writing, especially poetry. It creates tone, evokes emotion, and adds a layer of complexity to written works. Children who understand figurative language can better interpret texts and analyze them on a deeper level.

How does figurative language affect the reading experience? ›

It is a way for the reader to enter the words with their minds and emotions, rather than simply comprehending a story or poem. Figurative language encourages the reader to make connections with characters, plot, and the deeper message of a work which creates a more memorable experience for them.

How do you identify figurative language? ›

Look for the words "like" or "as" to find a simile, and look for the word "is" to find a metaphor. When you see those words, take a step back and look at what they are connecting. If two things are being compared, you might have a simile or a metaphor.

What is figurative language and why do we use it? ›

Figurative language makes meaning by asking the reader or listener to understand something by virtue of its relation to some other thing, action, or image. Figurative language can be contrasted with literal language, which describes something explicitly rather than by reference to something else.

How does figurative language create an impact to a writer? ›

Fiction writers use figurative language to engage their audience using a more creative tone that provokes thinking and sometimes humor. It makes fiction writing more interesting and dramatic than the literal language that uses words to refer to statements of fact.

How would an author describe figurative language? ›

Figurative language is essentially writing or oral communication that uses figures of speech, such as similes, metaphors, personification, and other literary devices like alliteration, onomatopoeia, and assonance, among others. In short, it is language that deviates from the literal meaning of words.

What is the definition of figurative language and examples? ›

Figurative language uses figures of speech (such as similes, metaphors and clichés) to suggest new pictures or images, or to create stronger effects. It is particularly useful in getting a specific message or feeling across. For instance, let's say I'm stuck in the desert with a friend because our car broke down.

How do you use figurative language? ›

Basically, figurative language is anytime you stretch the actual meaning of words for effect, whether to sound artistic, make a joke, or communicate more clearly and engagingly. Figurative language is a common technique in narrative writing, where the author strives to make emotional connections with the reader.

How does figurative language affect tone? ›

The emotional tone of a passage is the mood it embodies and evokes. Writers use figurative language to communicate certain elements of a story such as emotion and theme. Figurative language can take many forms, and the way an author chooses to use it affects the shape the piece takes.

How does figurative language enhance a story? ›

Figurative language can transform ordinary descriptions into evocative events, enhance the emotional significance of passages, and turn prose into a form of poetry. It can also help the reader to understand the underlying symbolism of a scene or more fully recognize a literary theme.

How does the use of figurative language enhance the speech? ›

When writers use figurative language (or a figure of speech), they are able to express a clearer picture with their words, creating more of an impact with their creative writing.

How does figurative language create suspense? ›

Figurative Language Advances the Plot

Figurative language can advance the plot of a short story. Figurative language can slow the pace of the plot through lengthy descriptions and comparisons to encourage a more philosophical approach, or it can be used to create suspense and drive the storyline.

What are the main types of figurative language? ›

While there are 12 common types, the five main branches of the figurative tree include metaphors, similes, personification, hyperbole, and symbolism. One of the best ways to understand the concept of figurative language is to see it in action.

What sentence is an example of figurative language? ›

You are using figurative language when writing goes beyond the actual meanings of words so that the reader gains new insights into the objects or subjects in the work. Alright, the sky misses the sun at night. The poorest man is the richest, and the rich are poor. Out of reach, I pull out with a screech.

What are the 7 types of figurative language and their definitions? ›

Personification, onomatopoeia , Hyperbole, Alliteration, Simily, Idiom, Metaphor.

Which of the following best describes figurative language? ›

Which of the following definitions best describes figurative language? Speech that goes beyond the literal meaning.

What figurative language uses like? ›

There are generally considered to be five main types of figurative language: simile, metaphor, hyperbole, allusion, and personification. A simile is a type of figurative language that compares two things using the words like or as. Here are a few examples: “She is as busy as a bee.”

How can figures of speech help you in making your composition more attractive to readers? ›

A figure of speech is a use of a word that diverges from its normal meaning, or a phrase with a specialized meaning not based on the literal meaning of the words in it such as a metaphor, simile, or personification. Figures of speech often provide emphasis, freshness of expression, or clarity.

What is figurative in simple terms? ›

Figurative language refers to words or phrases that are meaningful, but not literally true.

What is figurative language mood? ›

Mood: The atmosphere of a poem or scene in a story, and the emotion it creates in the reader. Mood comes from tone, figurative language, setting, word choice, and sensory details.

How do you put figurative language in an essay? ›

How to Add Figurative Language to an Essay
  1. Mark Dead Words. After you've completed a first draft of your essay, print off a copy and use a highlighter or colored pen to mark any words or phrases that are overused, boring, or otherwise lifeless. ...
  2. Show, Don't Tell. ...
  3. Don't Overdo It. ...
  4. Keep Practicing.

What is the difference between figurative language and literary devices? ›

Figurative language is any language that is non-literal in meaning. Similes, metaphors, and hyperbole are three examples of figurative language which can be used by authors. Literary devices include the use of figurative language, foreshadowing, and allusion, among many more.

What is the difference between figurative language and figurative speech? ›

Figurative language refers to language that contains figures of speech, while figures of speech are the particular techniques. If figurative speech is like a dance routine, figures of speech are like the various moves that make up the routine.

What is the difference between figurative language and imagery? ›

Definition. Figurative language is the language that uses words or expressions with meanings that are different from the literal interpretation. In contrast, imagery is the use of vivid or figurative language to represent objects, actions, or ideas, and appeal to our senses.

Is figurative language part of diction? ›

Diction is used in every form of writing, from poetic and figurative language to formal and concise wording.

How important is figures of speech and imagery to you as a tool in communication? ›

Figures of speech are a very important method of communication in our society. They specify between different shades of meaning and give more accurate descriptions. Some examples of common figures of speech include the simile, metaphor, pun, personification, hyperbole, understatement, paradox and oxymoron.

What makes figurative language different from straightforward language? ›

Literal language uses words exactly according to their conventionally accepted meanings or denotation. Figurative (or non-literal) language uses words in a way that deviates from their conventionally accepted definitions in order to convey a more complicated meaning or heightened effect.

What literary techniques create suspense? ›

10 Tips for Amplifying Suspense and Tension
  • Start the clock. ...
  • Finesse the point of view. ...
  • End a chapter with a cliffhanger. ...
  • Invest in strong character development. ...
  • Hint at what's to come. ...
  • Make your main character more complicated. ...
  • Layer in subplots to add to the suspense. ...
  • Create a false sense of security.
16 Nov 2021

What is the purpose of using figures of speech in writing stories and poems? ›

In poetry, either subjective feelings of poet or his/her description on objects can be expressed using figures of speech. They can be more effective means or vehicles to express, expand and explore the emotion, imagination and observation of poets.

What is an example of figurative language? ›

For example, if an athlete is doing well, you might say they're “on fire” figuratively. If their clothes catch on fire (which hopefully doesn't happen), then they'd be on fire literally.

What are the 5 main types of figurative language? ›

While there are 12 common types, the five main branches of the figurative tree include metaphors, similes, personification, hyperbole, and symbolism.

What are the 7 figurative language? ›

Personification, onomatopoeia , Hyperbole, Alliteration, Simily, Idiom, Metaphor.

Does interpreting figurative language require inference? ›

Similarly, readers do not have to identify the specific form of figurative language—whether you are dealing with a simile, metaphor, or any other form of figurative language. They must, however, see that the text does use figurative language and infer an appropriate meaning behind the words.

How do you use figurative language in a sentence? ›

You are using figurative language when writing goes beyond the actual meanings of words so that the reader gains new insights into the objects or subjects in the work. Alright, the sky misses the sun at night. The poorest man is the richest, and the rich are poor. Out of reach, I pull out with a screech.

Which is the best description of figurative language? ›

Figurative language refers to the use of words in a way that deviates from the conventional order and meaning in order to convey a complicated meaning, colorful writing, clarity, or evocative comparison. It uses an ordinary sentence to refer to something without directly stating it.

What are some examples of literal and figurative language? ›

Literal: it means what it says. The sky is full of dancing stars. Figurative: the sky seems to have very many twinkling stars in it, so many that they look like they are moving around using dance motions.

What is the difference between figurative language and literary devices? ›

Figurative language is any language that is non-literal in meaning. Similes, metaphors, and hyperbole are three examples of figurative language which can be used by authors. Literary devices include the use of figurative language, foreshadowing, and allusion, among many more.

What are the 8 figures of speech? ›

Uses of figures of speech

Many figures of speech contain metaphors, idioms, similes, ironies, antithesis, alliterations, personifications, and paradoxes. So as you learn about these figures of speech, you also start to understand other aspects of the English language.

What are the 10 figure of speech? ›

Examples
Figures of SpeechExamples
EuphemismHe passed away in his sleep
IronyYour hands are as clean as mud
AnaphoraDr Martin Luther King Jr: “I Have a Dream” Speech
ApostropheTwinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are
11 more rows

What are figurative language devices? ›

Figurative Language Definition

Figures of speech such as metaphors, similes, and allusions go beyond the literal meanings of the words to give readers new insights. On the other hand, alliterations, imageries, or onomatopoeias are figurative devices that appeal to the senses of the readers.

What are 5 examples of hyperbole? ›

Examples of Hyperbole
  • I'm so hungry, I could eat a horse.
  • My feet are killing me.
  • That plane ride took forever.
  • This is the best book ever written.
  • I love you to the moon and back.
  • The pen is mightier than the sword.
  • I've told you this 20,000 times.
  • Cry me a river.
30 May 2021

Is imagery a figurative language? ›

To sum up: imagery is not a form of figurative language. But a writer can enhance his or her effort to write imagery through the use of figurative language.

Videos

1. Analyzing an Author's Use of Figurative Language
(Amy Walter)
2. Figurative Language | Types of Figurative Language
(Mrs Roberts' Resources)
3. Figures of speech : How to identify the figurative ;language in a text
(Epic English Tutorials)
4. Interpreting Figurative Language
(Knowledgeis POWER)
5. LITERARY READING THROUGH A LINGUISTIC APPROACH
(DOC JEUNG CHANNEL)
6. Inferring and Interpreting Figurative Language
(Suzanne Cunningham)

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