Discover Sign Language (2022)

Discover Sign Language (1)

Gain confidence in your ability to sign with the Deaf community. This course immerses you in silence to help you gain an understanding of the perspective of the hearing impaired and uses videos to demonstrate not only how to make signs, but how to communicate with facial expression.

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6 Weeks / 24 Course Hrs

StartingNovember 16, 2022

Offered in partnership with your preferred school

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Learning method

Self-paced

$149

No instructor. Study on your own schedule

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Details + Objectives

Course code: dsl

Discover Sign Language will teach you how to sign basic phrases and complete sentences and how to put it all together, allowing you to introduce yourself and start a conversation. Along the way, you will learn signs for colors, numbers, locations, family, and the activities you like to do.

Throughout the course, you will learn by watching videos that demonstrate how to make the signs and how to incorporate facial expressions to communicate in this beautiful language. This course is taught using the best practices of the industry with a minimum of audio support. Throughout it, you will be immersed in silence, which will help you gain an understanding of the perspective of Deaf people and sign language.

You will also gain an introduction to the world of the Deaf culture and explore topics such as lip reading, baby signs, and the career of interpreting. By the end of the course, when you meet a Deaf person, you will be ready to sign!

What you will learn

  • Learn to create the signs for numbers and letters of the alphabet
  • Learn to sign phrases and expand to complete sentences
  • Understand how to put it all together so you can introduce yourself and start a conversation
  • Learn signs for colors, where you live, family, and the activities you like to do
  • Explore topics such as lip reading, baby signs, and the career of interpreting

How you will benefit

  • Learn to effectively communicate with Deaf people using their language
  • Gain confidence in your ability to walk up to and start a conversation with someone who is Deaf
  • Experience sign language and be immersed in a course that is mostly silent
  • Explore the profession of interpreting

How the course is taught

  • Instructor-led or self-paced online course
  • 6 Weeks or 3 Months access
  • 24 course hours

Outline

What is sign language? Is it a real language? How did it develop? In this lesson, you will discover what sign language is and who uses it. This lesson introduces American Sign Language and a basic approach to learning it—signing the numbers 0 to 15.

Master your ABCs as you learn how to fingerspell the alphabet. You will discover how double letters are made when they're inside a word and how they're signed when they fall at the beginning and end of words. You will also learn tips on how to read fingerspelling.

How do you do? In this lesson, you will take the first steps toward having a conversation as you learn how to introduce yourself. In addition to learning the basic signs for this kind of interaction, you will also gain some more strategies for learning and understanding new signs, including the four aspects that make up each sign. While you add these skills to your signing arsenal, you will also learn more about the Deaf community, including what Deaf people expect to learn about you when you meet for the first time, and the role facial expression plays in sign language.

Next, you will build on the introduction you learned in the last lesson and see how to keep the conversation going. You will explore the different customs of conversation in the Deaf community, such as how to know when one person is finished talking and how to take turns. In addition, you will continue to navigate your introduction by adding more information about yourself. Finally, you will gain some additional vocabulary as you learn the signs for colors and numbers 16 to 30.

In this lesson, you will learn more signs to help you continue the conversation you started in the two previous lessons. You will learn about the cherished custom Deaf people have of giving name signs, so you will understand what to call yourself, your city, and your state. You will also gain more vocabulary about objects in your living environment. You will learn to sign the types of dwellings people live in and modes of transportation. In addition, you will add to your knowledge of numbers by mastering the signs for numbers 31 to 66. This lesson closes with a discussion about an important issue in the Deaf community: whether deafness is considered a disability.

Signing becomes a family affair as you learn signs for family members. You will understand how sign language categorizes the signs for each gender and communication in families with a Deaf person. This includes lip reading and other communication strategies. This lesson closes with the signs for numbers 67 to 100.

This lesson focuses on signs for extended family members. You will also learn signs to describe how you're related to them. Start to put together longer sentences to practice using your new vocabulary. You will be introduced to number systems beginning with age and telling how old family members are.

What time is it? In this lesson, you will discover how to tell time as well as sign the days of the week and other time periods such as minutes and hours. You'll learn how spoken languages handle past, present, and future tenses and then examine how sign language does it. Finally, you will discover the impact of the "Deaf President Now" movement had on the lives of Deaf people.

This lesson teaches signs for additional time frames such as yesterday, today, and tomorrow. You will learn signs for indoor and outdoor activities. Then, you will learn signs for your opinion, so you can explain which activities you like and don't like. You will also learn about CODAs—a group of hearing people unique to the Deaf community.

Now it's time to learn the signs for feelings and personality traits, and you will combine these signs with signs learned in previous lessons. You will see how to communicate how you're doing, how to ask how others are doing, and how to describe different personal attributes. You will also learn more about Deaf culture—this time, about physical contact and getting the attention of a Deaf person both nearby and across the room. Finally, you will gain tips for practicing your signs.

In the final lesson, you will learn signs for clothing and hairstyles, such as jacket and long hair. You will learn about classifiers and how to use them with the patterns such as stripes. Then you will learn signs for descriptions such as mustache and beard. You will also explore another important aspect of Deaf culture: teaching hearing babies to sign.

The course concludes with a lesson that teaches you to wish a friend happy birthday, offer a birthday treat, and talk about your favorite animal. You will start by learning to sign the months of the year and how to say, "Happy birthday!" You will also learn some signs for food and animals. This lesson will cover how English is translated into sign language and the role of the professional sign language interpreter. You will even get some tips on using an interpreter with a Deaf person.

Instructors & Support

Erin Trimble holds a Bachelor of Science in American Sign Language/English Interpreting from William Woods University and a Master of Arts in Interpreting Studies degree from Western Oregon University. Since 2003, Trimble has been professionally interpreting across a variety of settings including education, community, and medical. She has been both a staff interpreter and a freelance interpreter.

(Video) discovery-[FIND!]

Requirements

Prerequisites:

There are no prerequisites to take this course.

Requirements:

Hardware Requirements:

  • This course can be taken on either a PC, Mac, or Chromebook.

Software Requirements:

  • PC: Windows 8 or later.
  • Mac: macOS 10.6 or later.
  • Browser: The latest version of Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred. Microsoft Edge and Safari are also compatible.
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader.
  • Software must be installed and fully operational before the course begins.

Other:

  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.

Instructional Material Requirements:

The instructional materials required for this course are included in enrollment and will be available online.

FAQ

Instructor-Led: A new session of each course begins each month. Please refer to the session start dates for scheduling.
Self-Paced: You can start this course at any time your schedule permits.

Instructor-Led: Once a course session starts, two lessons will be released each week for the 6 week duration of your course. You will have access to all previously released lessons until the course ends.
Self-Paced: You have 3 month access to the course. After enrolling, you can learn and complete the course at your own pace, within the allotted access period.

Instructor-Led: The interactive discussion area for each lesson automatically closes two weeks after each lesson is released, so you're encouraged to complete each lesson within two weeks of its release.
Self-Paced: There is no time limit to complete each lesson, other than completing all lessons within the allotted access period.

Instructor-Led: The final exam will be released on the same day as the last lesson. Once the final exam has been released, you will have two weeks plus 10 days (24 days total) to complete the final and finish any remaining lessons in your course. No further extensions can be provided beyond these 10 days.
Self-Paced: Because this course is self-paced, no extensions will be granted after the start of your enrollment.

Yes! This course is designed to help you feel comfortable conversing with the deaf and hearing impaired community. You'll be taught conversational sign language that will help you introduce yourself and start a conversation. You'll also learn the alphabet so you can fingerspell names and words as well as colors, numbers, and common phrases that will help you form sentences. After completion of this course, you'll be able to sign!

Not necessarily. The Foreign Service Institute classifies the ease of learning a new language based on its similarity to English. While experts do not agree on which category American Sign Language should be placed, it is clear that is not listed in the easiest category because it is not similar to English. However, with dedication and the right training through our Discover Sign Language course, you will be using sign language to communicate in no time!

Hearing loss is much more common than many people think. In fact, nearly 28 million Americans suffer from some degree of hearing loss. Hearing loss increases after the age of 65, and by age 75 nearly 50 percent of people will have at least some hearing loss. Learning sign language can help you better communicate with these people, and even someone in your own family who may suffer hearing loss as they age in the future.

No. Signed languages are no different from languages spoken all over the world. Different countries use different forms of sign language. Our Discover Sign Language course teaches American Sign Language (ASL) which is used in the United States, Canada and some parts of Mexico. ASL is also used in some countries in Central America, Africa and Asia with modifications.

Learning sign language could help you in your job. The Americans with Disabilities Act sometimes requires companies to have an interpreter for deaf or hearing-impaired individuals, so being able to converse in sign language could be a resume booster. Basic knowledge of sign language will also go a long way in showing customers that you care for their needs.

This course will help you converse with the deaf and hearing impaired. You can bridge gaps between yourself and this population as well as open the door to meeting new people. You'll also explore lip reading and baby signs which can help you when working with even more people. It may even give you an opportunity to get involved with volunteer organizations.

Learning a new language can keep your brain healthy and agile. You'll create new connections among neurons which can improve your memory and problem-solving skills as you age. You can also set an example for your children who will be inspired by watching you learn to reach out to a new group of individuals.

Reviews

This course was excellent for a total beginner. I knew no signs before this class. Jennifer is an outstanding instructor. I couldn't wait to start each one of my lessons. She made it fun and I looked forwarded to it.

Such a great course for the relevant content needed to understand the basics of sign language! The instructor was fantastic and knowledgable in this area. She gave us variations to signs that we may see, which is super helpful. Overall, this was a great course.

What a wonderful course! Over eight short weeks, I've learned enough to have a basic conversation in American Sign Language. The teacher's writing and videos are fantastic and lead students through a logical progression of sign language skills acquisition.

As someone who has done an entire college diploma through distance education online, I have to say that this is one of the best online courses I have ever taken. It was fun and challenging. The instructor was great and always quick to respond. I learned more than I had even hoped I would. I will definitely recommend this course to friends and colleagues.

(Video) Discover Sign Language - Online class

I appreciated the diversity of information provided, including insights into deaf culture and communities. I feel more confident in my ability to interact with someone who is deaf simply because I understand a bit more. This course is a great beginner course and I find myself wanting to learn more--preferably from the same instructor.

This course and its instructor is fabulous. I learned so much more than I thought I would. It is well constructed, and thoughtfully led. I would like to see more courses available along this line. A "next level" to build on the skills learned, and information. As a language course of study, this is the best taught I have encountered.

This was the best online training I have ever worked through!

This was a great class, I really learned a lot about the Deaf Community, and signing and I feel very comfortable signing simple conversations. I loved this class, thank you for making it interesting. I highly recommend this course.

Jennifer Carmean is an excellent teacher. I learned so much valuable information that will help me to communicate with the deaf students on my caseload. If she offered a follow-up class, I would definitely take it. The course material and the supplementary material that she provided was relevant and interesting.

I absolutely loved this course. I learned so much in so little time!

This course was excellent for a total beginner. I knew no signs before this class. Jennifer is an outstanding instructor. I couldn't wait to start each one of my lessons. She made it fun and I looked forwarded to it.

Such a great course for the relevant content needed to understand the basics of sign language! The instructor was fantastic and knowledgable in this area. She gave us variations to signs that we may see, which is super helpful. Overall, this was a great course.

What a wonderful course! Over eight short weeks, I've learned enough to have a basic conversation in American Sign Language. The teacher's writing and videos are fantastic and lead students through a logical progression of sign language skills acquisition.

As someone who has done an entire college diploma through distance education online, I have to say that this is one of the best online courses I have ever taken. It was fun and challenging. The instructor was great and always quick to respond. I learned more than I had even hoped I would. I will definitely recommend this course to friends and colleagues.

I appreciated the diversity of information provided, including insights into deaf culture and communities. I feel more confident in my ability to interact with someone who is deaf simply because I understand a bit more. This course is a great beginner course and I find myself wanting to learn more--preferably from the same instructor.

This course and its instructor is fabulous. I learned so much more than I thought I would. It is well constructed, and thoughtfully led. I would like to see more courses available along this line. A "next level" to build on the skills learned, and information. As a language course of study, this is the best taught I have encountered.

(Video) Deb Russell | Sign Language Interpreters: Discover & Recover an Enduring Legacy

This was the best online training I have ever worked through!

This was a great class, I really learned a lot about the Deaf Community, and signing and I feel very comfortable signing simple conversations. I loved this class, thank you for making it interesting. I highly recommend this course.

Jennifer Carmean is an excellent teacher. I learned so much valuable information that will help me to communicate with the deaf students on my caseload. If she offered a follow-up class, I would definitely take it. The course material and the supplementary material that she provided was relevant and interesting.

I absolutely loved this course. I learned so much in so little time!

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Discover Sign Language (2)

Fundamentals

Individual Excellence

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Skills for Making Great Decisions

Discover Sign Language (5)

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FAQs

Who first discovered sign language? ›

The first person credited with the creation of a formal sign language for the hearing impaired was Pedro Ponce de León, a 16th-century Spanish Benedictine monk. His idea to use sign language was not a completely new idea.

Can I learn sign language on my own? ›

All in all, it is not really possible to teach yourself ASL. If you want to start holding meaningful conversations in ASL, you will need formal instruction and practice. However, it is possible to learn basics like the ASL alphabet to get a head start.

What are the 3 types of sign language? ›

Not a Universal Language

Interestingly, most countries that share the same spoken language do not necessarily have the same sign language as each other. English for example, has three varieties: American Sign Language (ASL), British Sign Language (BSL) and Australian Sign Language (Auslan).

What are 5 interesting facts about sign language? ›

Five Interesting Facts Most People Don't Know About Sign Language
  • It's the fourth most used language in the UK. ...
  • Different countries have their own versions of sign language. ...
  • Sign language uses more than just hand gestures. ...
  • Many deaf people have 'name signs' ...
  • Sign language isn't as difficult to learn as it looks.
23 Sept 2021

How did sign language originally start? ›

Sign language, as we know it today, originated in the 16th century when an Italian physician called Geronimo Cardano, decided to teach deaf people by writing a combination of symbols and associating them with the thing they represented.

What is the history of sign language? ›

Before we developed speech the form of interaction was via hand and facial gestures. As the deaf were often persecuted, sign language didn't develop from this point until the 1500s when Pedro de Leon, a Benedictine monk, created a form of sign language so he could communicate during his vow of silence.

How long does it take the average person to learn sign language? ›

Overall, it can take several years of regular study and practice to become fluent in sign language. It may take from three months to three years to learn sign language. Moreover, it's all about your learning goal setting, and it all depends on your end goal.

What is the best place to learn sign language? ›

The 7 Best Online Sign Language Classes of 2022
  • Best Overall: Gallaudet University.
  • Best Budget: American Sign Language University.
  • Best for Beginners: ASL Meredith.
  • Best for Families: Sign It! ASL.
  • Best for School Credit: Start ASL.
  • Best for One-on-One Lessons: SignOn Connect.
  • Best for Vocabulary: ASLDeafined.
13 Sept 2022

How difficult is sign language? ›

Sign language is one of the easiest languages to learn. So many of the signs are commonplace gestures. Children pick up on the signs quickly and are eager to use them. The fact that it is easy helps encourage the learning.

What is the most used sign language? ›

ASL, short for American Sign Language, is the sign language most commonly used by the Deaf and Hard of Hearing people in the United States. Approximately more than a half-million people throughout the US (1) use ASL to communicate as their native language.

What is the most famous sign language? ›

American Sign Language (ASL) is the most widely-used sign language around the world. Signers are spread across the USA and Canada, as well as parts of Mexico, Africa, and Asia. It developed when French Sign Language (FSL) was brought over to the USA in 1817 by Thomas Gallaudet and Laurent Clerc.

What is the universal sign language? ›

There is no universal sign language. Different sign languages are used in different countries or regions. For example, British Sign Language (BSL) is a different language from ASL, and Americans who know ASL may not understand BSL. Some countries adopt features of ASL in their sign languages.

Why is sign language important? ›

Sign languages are an extremely important communication tool for many deaf and hard-of-hearing people. Sign languages are the native languages of the Deaf community and provide full access to communication.

Why is sign language special? ›

Special Needs – Social Benefits of Sign Language

Sign language reduces frustration by providing a way to expressively communicate in situations where verbal communication may not be successful. Sign language breaks down communication barriers for children with various disabilities and needs.

How effective is sign language? ›

Research shows that sign language speeds up speech development, reduces frustration in young children by giving them a means to express themselves before they know how to talk, increases parent-child bonding, and lets babies communicate vital information, such as if they are hurt or hungry.

Who was the first deaf person? ›

c. 44 B.C.: Quintus Pedius is the earliest deaf person in recorded history known by name.

What was the first ever sign language? ›

The French priest, Charles Michel de l'Eppe founded the first public school for the deaf in Paris in 1755. Using the informal signs his students brought from their homes and a manual alphabet, he created the world's first formal sign language, Old French Sign Language.

What country did sign language originate from? ›

It's impossible to know exactly when and where the first deaf person tried out sign, but we do know that the first written record of sign language came from Ancient Greece.

Why was sign language banned 1880? ›

In 1880, there was a large multi-country conference of deaf educators called the Second International Congress on the Education of the Deaf. At this conference, a declaration was made that oral education was better than manual (sign) education. As a result, sign language in schools for the Deaf was banned.

What is the best age to learn sign language? ›

When to start baby sign language. Typically, most babies can begin signing in the range of 8-12 months of age. Rebelo suggests that interested parents begin using sign language when their baby is 6-8 months old but says not to worry if your child is older since there isn't a magical window that closes.

Which sign language should I learn ASL or BSL? ›

Should I learn the American sign language or the British sign language? You should learn the Sign Language of the community in which you live. So, if you live in America then clearly American sign language is the way to go. If you live in Britain, learn BSL.

What is the easiest language to learn? ›

15 of the easiest languages to learn for English speakers - ranked
  • Frisian. Frisian is thought to be one of the languages most closely related to English, and therefore also the easiest for English-speakers to pick up. ...
  • Dutch. ...
  • Norwegian. ...
  • Spanish. ...
  • Portuguese. ...
  • Italian. ...
  • French. ...
  • Swedish.
24 Oct 2021

What are the weaknesses of sign language? ›

Sign language requires the use of hands to make gestures. This can be a problem for people who do not have full use of their hands. Even seemingly manageable disabilities such as Parkinson's or arthritis can be a major problem for people who must communicate using sign language.

What's the hardest language to learn? ›

As mentioned before, Mandarin is unanimously considered the most difficult language to master in the world! Spoken by over a billion people in the world, the language can be extremely difficult for people whose native languages use the Latin writing system.

Which is harder sign language or Spanish? ›

If your first language is English, you might still find Spanish easier to learn than ASL, since there are some cognates in common. If you're an auditory learner, you'll probably find it easier to learn Spanish than ASL, which is spoken in the visual modality.

Which is the easiest sign language? ›

People who are visual learners say ASL is easier and can easily pick up, but non visual learners find that Spanish is easier to pick up than ASL.

Which country uses ASL the most? ›

ASL is used predominantly in the United States and in many parts of Canada. ASL is accepted by many high schools, colleges, and universities in fulfillment of modern and “foreign” language academic degree requirements across the United States.

Is there a sign for every word? ›

Answer: There is not a sign for every word in the English dictionary. However, there is usually a sign for most concepts expressed in English. Conceptually correctness is the key. If you are trying to find a sign on Signing Savvy, first think about the meaning behind what you want to say.

What percentage of deaf people use sign language? ›

That's because not all deaf and hard-of-hearing people know sign language. In fact, of the 48 million people in the United States with hearing loss, less than 500,000 — or about 1% — use sign language. Hearing loss is a spectrum, with varying types of loss and communication strategies.

What sign language is closest to ASL? ›

ASL is most closely related to French Sign Language (LSF). It has been proposed that ASL is a creole language of LSF, although ASL shows features atypical of creole languages, such as agglutinative morphology.

How many people are fluent in sign language? ›

Approximately 250,000 – 500,000 people of all ages throughout the US and Canada use this language to communicate as their native language. ASL is the third most commonly used language in the United States, after English and Spanish.

Is there a Bible in sign language? ›

The ASL bible has 850,000 full downloads, and 2.6 million have downloaded at least a portion of the Bible. “This is more than just about Jehovah's Witnesses. It's about the deaf community around the world accessing God's word in their own language,” Hendriks said.

Why do interpreters wear black? ›

Sign language interpreters have to follow specific guidelines of behavior and appearance. Their attire should be unobtrusive, and they were taught during their training to wear black or clothing made from dark-colored fabric. Moreover, clothing with dark colors helps people with low vision to see them better.

What is the official sign language? ›

American Sign Language (ASL)

250,000-500,000 people in the United States claim ASL as their native language. It's also used in Canada, West Africa and Southeast Asia. ASL is based on French Sign Language, but was also influenced by Martha's Vineyard Sign Language and other local sign languages.

How do you explain sign language? ›

Sign language is manual communication commonly used by people who are deaf. Sign language is not universal; people who are deaf from different countries speak different sign languages. The gestures or symbols in sign language are organized in a linguistic way. Each individual gesture is called a sign.

How is sign language best used? ›

American Sign Language is commonly used at loud venues where normal communication is not possible, such as at construction sites, musical concerts and racing events. Through ASL, you can easily communicate with others, regardless of the loud background noise, even with earplugs to protect your hearing.

Why is sign language beautiful? ›

It's beautiful, elegant and expressive. The benefits are countless and just as easy to learn as any other language! - Whether you may Deaf/Hard of Hearing or hearing, it elevates your life and makes you a better communicator in all possible aspects. Simply put, no words can do sign language justice.

Why can only deaf people give sign names? ›

Many hearing people are surprised to learn that the deaf community has it's own unique naming system. The only true way to get a name sign is to be given one by individuals who are deaf, since ASL is their native language. Nationally certified sign language interpreter, advocate, and ally to the d/Deaf community.

How many sign language are there in the world? ›

Today, there are more than 300 different sign languages in the world, spoken by more than 72 million deaf or hard-of-hearing people worldwide.

Who can benefit from sign language? ›

ASL is primarily used by American and Canadians who are either deaf or hard of hearing. There are approximately 250,000 – 500,000 ASL users in the United States and Canada, most of whom use ASL as their primary language.

Do deaf people prefer sign language or text? ›

For the most part, pre-lingually deaf people who learn American sign language as their first language, always prefer to see an ASL interpreter on-screen over closed captions. However, the same isn't true for people who suffer hearing loss later in life.

Is sign language easier than English? ›

As with anything new, learning a language takes time, patience, and hard work. Some have the misconseption that learning ASL is easier than learning a spoken language. This is incorrect. Experts estimate that it takes 3-4 years to become fluent in a new language on average.

Is sign language a valuable skill? ›

Learning sign language is crucial for those who are deaf or hearing impaired, as well as their friends and family members. But, what many people may not realize is that sign language can be a valuable life skill for just about anyone to develop.

When was the first sign language invented? ›

The recorded history of sign language in Western societies starts in the 17th century, as a visual language or method of communication, although references to forms of communication using hand gestures date back as far as 5th century BC Greece.

Did Helen Keller invent sign language? ›

#2.

The desire to be able to speak out became so strong, Helen even created a kind of sign language with her friend Marsha Washington – and by the time she was just seven years old, they'd already made up over 60 signs to communicate to each other.

Where was the first sign language created? ›

The First Formal Sign Language System

Charles Michel de l'Épée was a French priest who founded the first free public school for the Deaf in Paris in 1755. l'Épée was the first to compose a standardized French sign language alphabet.

When and where was sign language invented? ›

ASL is thought to have originated in the American School for the Deaf (ASD), founded in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1817. Originally known as The American Asylum, At Hartford, For The Education And Instruction Of The Deaf And Dumb, the school was founded by the Yale graduate and divinity student Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet.

Did early humans use sign language? ›

Early human communication may have been in sign language or song, and scientists are studying other animals to learn how human language evolved.

Is there a universal sign language? ›

There is no universal sign language. Different sign languages are used in different countries or regions. For example, British Sign Language (BSL) is a different language from ASL, and Americans who know ASL may not understand BSL. Some countries adopt features of ASL in their sign languages.

Did a deaf person invent sign language? ›

Like any deaf person would, the children who attended the schools for the deaf created a language to communicate. Spoken language is not the natural language of the deaf. They naturally defaulted to their native language–sign language. Therefore, no one person invented sign language.

What was Helen Keller's IQ? ›

What was Helen Keller's IQ? Helen Keller had an IQ of 160.

Could Helen Keller speak? ›

Helen had developmental disabilities that rendered her unable to see, hear or speak since she was 19 months old. But thanks to her determined teacher Anne Sullivan, Helen was able to interact and communicate with the world around her.

Who was the first deaf teacher? ›

Golladay, Loy. "Laurent Clerc: America's Pioneer Deaf Teacher." The Deaf American March 1980: 3-6.

How many sign languages are there? ›

There are more than 300 different sign languages in use around the world. They vary from nation to nation. Even in countries where the same language is spoken, sign language can have many different regional accents that bring subtle variations to people's use and understanding of signs.

Why do we have sign language? ›

Sign languages are an extremely important communication tool for many deaf and hard-of-hearing people. Sign languages are the native languages of the Deaf community and provide full access to communication.

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